ancientart:

Rhyton terminating in the forepart of a wild cat. Parthian, ca. 1st century B.C.

Elaborate bowls, animal-headed drinking vessels, and rhytons—vessels which have a hole at the front from which liquid flows—were highly valued in ancient Near Eastern society. During the pre-Achaemenid, Achaemenid, and Parthian periods, examples made of silver, gold, and clay were used throughout a vast area extending both to the east and west of Iran. The animals on these vessels included the ram, horse, bull, ibex, supernatural creatures, and female divinities; some were engraved with royal inscriptions. Rhytons made of precious materials were probably luxury wares used at royal courts. Both the rhyton and the animal-headed vessel were adopted by the Greek world as exotic and prestigious Oriental products.
Dating from the Parthian period, this silver rhyton is a fine example of the enduring influence of Hellenistic culture, which owes much to the artistic traditions of Achaemenid Iran. The horn-shaped vessel ends in the forepart of a panther; a spout for pouring is in the middle of the chest. A gilded fruit-laden grapevine winds around the panther’s chest; at the other end of the rhyton, an ivy wreath encircles the rim. These are the symbols of the Greek wine god Dionysus, whose cult spread eastward with the invasion of Alexander. Dionysiac images—panthers, grapevines, and dancing females—were absorbed by the Parthians and continued to appear in the art of Near Eastern cultures in the Sasanian period (A.D. 224–651). (MET)

Courtesy of & currently located at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, via their online collections, 1979.447.

ancientart:

Rhyton terminating in the forepart of a wild cat. Parthian, ca. 1st century B.C.

Elaborate bowls, animal-headed drinking vessels, and rhytons—vessels which have a hole at the front from which liquid flows—were highly valued in ancient Near Eastern society. During the pre-Achaemenid, Achaemenid, and Parthian periods, examples made of silver, gold, and clay were used throughout a vast area extending both to the east and west of Iran. The animals on these vessels included the ram, horse, bull, ibex, supernatural creatures, and female divinities; some were engraved with royal inscriptions. Rhytons made of precious materials were probably luxury wares used at royal courts. Both the rhyton and the animal-headed vessel were adopted by the Greek world as exotic and prestigious Oriental products.

Dating from the Parthian period, this silver rhyton is a fine example of the enduring influence of Hellenistic culture, which owes much to the artistic traditions of Achaemenid Iran. The horn-shaped vessel ends in the forepart of a panther; a spout for pouring is in the middle of the chest. A gilded fruit-laden grapevine winds around the panther’s chest; at the other end of the rhyton, an ivy wreath encircles the rim. These are the symbols of the Greek wine god Dionysus, whose cult spread eastward with the invasion of Alexander. Dionysiac images—panthers, grapevines, and dancing females—were absorbed by the Parthians and continued to appear in the art of Near Eastern cultures in the Sasanian period (A.D. 224–651). (MET)

Courtesy of & currently located at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, via their online collections1979.447.

Reblogged from ancientart with 2,806 notes

"…it’s a substitute for war. Everything we’re doing in the world today has to do with destruction and death and murder and war, and we need something to make us all feel better, and that’s space travel."

Ray Bradbury, speaking about the purpose of manned space exploration in a 2003 interview following the launch of the Spirit and Opportunity rovers to Mars.

The full interview, which you can hear in the video below from Brain Pickings, is a bit of a pessimistic take on things, but his call for inspirational change in our schools and culture is a good one. 

What do you think, have things improved since 2003? Would Ray be happy with us?

Ray Bradbury on space exploration, education, and legacy from Maria Popova on Vimeo.

(via jtotheizzoe)

Reblogged from jtotheizzoe with 410 notes

Currently alternating between dancing and crying because it hurts but what if I’m never able to dance again. Better do whatever I can now before the doctor commands me not to dance anymore.

brb...Deleting SoundCloud.

thisisadynasty:

Reblogged from thisisadynasty with 1,061 notes

nonconcept:

"Brick Masonry" by Japanese Architects no.555.

nonconcept:

"Brick Masonry" by Japanese Architects no.555.

Reblogged from dailywired with 1,190 notes

nonconcept:

Renovated Country House, Denmark by Nicholas R. Ernst Architects.

nonconcept:

Renovated Country House, Denmark by Nicholas R. Ernst Architects.

Reblogged from dailywired with 3,759 notes

forbiddenforrest:

Storm Discoloration by Pan.101 on Flickr.

forbiddenforrest:

Storm Discoloration by Pan.101 on Flickr.

Reblogged from mentalalchemy with 95 notes

fuzzykitty01:

gonedolin:

source

Livin’ the dream. 

Reblogged from dutchfarm with 280,318 notes

so much fomo last night

just a bit :(

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